By Dawn Luger | The Daily Sheeple | April 16, 2018

Police have used a photo sent through the app “WhatsApp” to get a fingerprint and used that fingerprint to secure drug convictions against eleven people. If part of your finger is showing, cops can now use that small bit as fingerprint evidence.

This new and  “groundbreaking” technique of matching fingerprints found in photos “is the future” of how cops will catch “criminals.” It’s changing how law enforcement looks at social media images for potential evidence.

According to CSO Online, police have long used fingerprints in criminal investigations, in a new twist, cops used one photo sent via WhatsApp and a “pioneering fingerprint technique” to ultimately secure drug convictions against 11 people.

It all started with a drug bust.  The bust resulted in the police getting hold of a phone that had a WhatsApp message and image of ecstasy pills in a person’s palm. The message read: “For sale – Skype and Ikea-branded ecstasy pills…are you interested?”

The phone was sent to South Wales Police where the photo showing the middle and bottom portion of a pinky was enhanced. As for fingerprint identification, the BBC reported that “a search of the national database did not bring a match” as “when offenders give fingerprints, it is just the top part taken — with the middle and bottom part only occasionally left.” A different BBC article stated that “other evidence meant officers had an idea who they believed was behind the drugs operation.”

Dave Thomas of the South Wales Police’s scientific support unit told the BBC, “While the scale and quality of the photograph proved a challenge, the small bits were enough to prove he was the dealer.” But how did they determine who they were looking for, to begin with?  It’s all a little confusing, and cops don’t come out and tell us they are violating our rights, even though, for all intents and purposes, that’s exactly what happened here.

According to the South Wales Police press release, “A boastful drug dealer” was “caught red-handed after a pioneering technique was used to identify his fingerprints in a photograph he sent showing off his supply.”

Detective Inspector Dean Taylor told the BBC, “We knew Elliott was handling drugs of a similar type, but we didn’t know who was holding the bags in the photograph. He was linked by his fingerprint which also linked him to the messages and showed he was sending the supply.” But as mentioned earlier, Elliott’s prints were not on file, so he was assumed to be the dealer.

Staff from the unit’s specialist imaging team were able to enhance a picture of a hand holding a number of tablets, which was taken from a mobile phone before fingerprint experts were able to positively identify that the hand was that of Elliott Morris.

This is all just a little too Orwellian and Big Brother for our taste.  It certainly seems like, in order to make sure that that hand was Morris’, police would have to have had him in custody.  “Despite being provided with only a very small section of the fingerprint which was visible in the photograph, the team were able to successfully identify the individual,” said Dave Thomas, forensic operations manager at the Scientific Support Unit.

Thomas pointed out that 80% of people have mobile phones and use them to snap photos that the cops can “download and enhance.” Other cops are now looking through social media images, as well as images in seized phones, for potential fingerprinting identification evidence.


Contributed by Dawn Luger of TheDailySheeple.com

Dawn Luger is a staff writer and reporter for The Daily Sheeple.


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By B N Frank | Activist Post | April 8, 2018

In December 2016, Governor John Kasich signed Senate Bill 331 (aka “The Petland Bill”) which had originally been written regarding puppy mills and the humane treatment of animals.  At the last minute, several completely unrelated clauses were added to it.  One of them eliminated municipal governments’ ability to stop telecom companies from installing small cell tower infrastructure wherever they wanted – including in front of homes, in public rights of ways, historical districts, etc.  This violated the Ohio Constitution’s “single subject rule” and many immediately cried foul.

On March 20, 2017, press conferences were held in Cleveland and Central Ohio to announce that 80 Ohio municipal governments had filed lawsuits against the cell tower clause in this bill.  Eventually 90 Ohio municipal governments filed lawsuits.

Much has happened since then.  Some judges ruled in favor of the municipal governments.  Telecom companies appealed and new judges overturned rulings.  Some municipal governments who filed lawsuits seemed to have given up.  Some municipal governments embraced the idea of small cells before the bill passed and then again after the bill passed.  Some were identified early on as being difficult.

Because of all of this, Ohio elected officials decided to create a brand spanking new bill – one that proudly gives telecom companies the right to do whatever they please:  HB 478:  Small Cells Expansion Bill.

It’s still being opposed.  But it’s also being voted on this week.

Outside of Ohio, consumer groups, doctors, environmentalists, municipal governments, and scientists have been fighting similar state bills.  Because of this, they have not passed.

Firefighters have fought cell towers being installed on station property for many years already due to health concerns.

There are also 50+ federal bills being discussed which will eliminate municipal authority regarding cell tower placement.  These are also being fought.

The Nation recently published an article about cell phone safety and 5G technology.  The Wireless Industry is being compared to “Big Tobacco” and “Big Oil.”  Those of us who have lived long enough understand that this isn’t a compliment.

The article has been recirculated by other publications such as Democracy Now.Last week, NPR also featured the article and topic for discussion during their On Point program.

So what does Dr. Oz have to do with this?  Controversy regarding cell phone and wireless radiation is nothing new.  In 2009, he spoke about it on Good Morning America.

On February 9, 2018, he featured a segment on his show called “The Rise of 5G Cell Towers.”  According to his introduction, these cell towers are being installed everywhere so Americans can “binge-watch, surf and post online” at faster speeds without their screens freezing up or being disconnected.

5G is new technology.  But there is still firm research there is more potential harm from it than 4G wireless.

The human body has between two million to four million sweat ducts. Dr. Ben-Ishai of Hebrew University, Israel explains that our sweat ducts act like “an array of helical antennas when exposed to these wavelengths,” meaning that we become more conductive.

Sweat ducts acting like helical antennas = MORE SWEATING.  Of course, 5G may also increase your metabolism.  But it still means being a sweatier than usual 24/7.   That’s not sexy.

Of course, 5G cell towers are going to affect children and pets, too.

But let’s get back to the binge-watching.  Encouraging and enabling Ohioans to “binge-watch, surf and post online” seems particularly inappropriate considering there is already a rampant opioid addiction problem in the state.  Attorney General, Mike Dewine already filed lawsuits with several pharmaceutical companies and claimed “Drugmakers got Ohioans addicted, raked in profits.”

So how again is it a good thing for elected officials and telecom companies to encourage and enable digital addiction when it’s a bad thing to encourage and enable opioid addiction?

Many Ohioans also enjoy nature and wildlife in the Buckeye State. 5G isn’t good for nature or wildlife. In fact, none of this wireless stuff is or has ever been good for them.  All of this is being installed to accommodate humans – even when we’re trying to enjoy nature and wildlife.

In 2014, The Wall Street Journal published an article about how 1 in 10 cell towers violated current RF safety standards.  The Federal Communications Commission also wasn’t making sure this was being corrected.  “The Race for 5G” means even more cell towers which means there will probably be more cell towers in violation of safety standards.

5G small cell towers are also a key component in connecting everything together a la “The Internet of Things (IoT).”  IoT already has a 75% failure rate due to hacking and more.  This is a threat to your privacy.  Therefore, IoT is really only cool if you like being hacked and having your privacy violated.

Security experts like Huffington Post’s Bruce Kushnick can’t say enough BAD things about IoT or 5G.  He’s referred to it as taxpayers being forced to bailout the telecom industry.

If none of this still bothers you, small cell towers being installed in front of homes and in neighborhoods will also reduce property value.

Cell towers can also catch fire or collapse.

Over the past few months, many media sources including CBS News have been encouraging us to be more careful with our cell phones and other personal wireless devices and electronics.  Many have also encouraged parents to limit how much their children use these devices.  Tech inventors already have been doing this for several years. Maybe it’s because they knew that no “safe” level of cell phone or wireless (WiFi) radiation has still been scientifically determined for children or pregnant women.

Unfortunately changing your habits won’t help much when 4G and 5G small cell towers are installed everywhere

Ohio elected officials don’t seem to care about that.  Or maybe it’s just that their brains have been too scrambled by all of this already.

What’s worse – since 2010, most Ohio utility companies have also installed digital or wireless “Smart” utility meters on homes and buildings throughout the state.  Ohio Senate Bill 181 “Smart Meter Consent Bill” was introduced in 2013 and endorsed by the ACLU.

It didn’t pass but many Ohio utilities eventually started offering “opt-outs” because of all the complaints.

All over the world, these meters have caused enormous problems already.  Many have already been replaced because of fires, explosions, malfunctioning appliances, measurement errors, general failure, and depreciation.   Many Ohioans now seem to be footing the bill to replace their old crappy “smart” meters with new crappy “smart” meters.

You may not have suffered any consequences yet from these “smart” meters.  But if you end up with a small cell tower near your home you’re basically being double-fried by microwave radiationAy, oh, way to go, Ohio.

Have you ever asked yourself, “If Wireless Radiation Exposure Is No Big Deal, Why Do Manuals for Cell Phones, iPads, Wi-Fi Routers, Etc. Include Guidelines and Warnings?”

Maybe you should ask that of your elected officials if they have.

Ohioans, if you don’t want this installed all over your state, start calling your senators today and tell them to VOTE NO on HB 478:

Senate President

Mr. Larry Obhof

(614) 466-7505 – KILL HB 478

Senate Public Utilities Committee

Bill Beagle                    (614) 466-6247

Chair

Rob McColley              (614) 466-8150

Vice Chair

Lou Terhar                  (614) 466-8068

(Local Cincinnati Senator)

Frank LaRose             (614) 466-4823

Sandy Williams          (614) 466-4857

Sean O’Brien              (614) 466-7182

Vernon Sykes             (614) 466-7041

Dave Burke                (614) 466-8049

Rob McColley              (614) 466-8150

Vice Chair

Lou Terhar                  (614) 466-8068

(Local Cincinnati Senator)

Frank LaRose             (614) 466-4823

Sandy Williams          (614) 466-4857

Sean O’Brien              (614) 466-7182

Vernon Sykes             (614) 466-7041

Dave Burke                (614) 466-8049


Contributed by B.N. Frank of ActivistPost.com where this article was originally published.


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Isabella Z. | Natural News | Jan. 21, 2017

Just when you thought connected devices couldn’t get any more intrusive, Amazon steps in and takes things up a notch with its Echo Spot, which is already available in the U.S. and soon to launch in the U.K. With its “smart alarm” feature being heavily marketed, the internet retail giant is hoping you’ll place it next to your bed – most likely facing it directly as this is the most obvious placement for alarm clocks.

Of course, this is much more than an alarm clock. It is equipped with a microphone and camera, and it actually hears people talking all the way across the room, even when music is playing. In other words, it’s always listening to you. What it’s doing with all that highly personal information, however, is anyone’s guess.

In fact, Amazon wants you to place one in every room of your house, a move they are encouraging by making the devices work together. For example, its multi-room music feature allows people to play music throughout their home by placing Echo Spots in each room – all while Amazon watches and listens to their every move.

Would you willingly place little spy devices throughout your house?

Each Echo Spot is essentially a little spy device, constantly collecting information about you. Amazon might argue that it’s just trying to offer you a more personalized experience, but where does it stop? Even if their intentions were entirely wholesome, what happens when hackers and others with ill intentions get a hold of your most sensitive conversations or video footage of your private moments?

Amazon says that they take customer privacy seriously, and that measures have been taken to make it secure. The microphone, they say, is just listening out for you to utter the keyword to activate it, but there have been cases of these devices activating unintentionally in the past.

Amazon points out that there is a mic/camera off hardware button. However, to turn off the camera, you also have to turn off the microphone, which means you can do very little with the device and really defeats its purpose. It seems like this feature was added just so they can say they give people privacy options; it’s far from practical if people want to actually use the device as intended.

They also say that communications are encrypted and that third-party app installation has been disallowed on the device. However, where there’s a will, there’s a way, and it won’t be long before clever hackers are able to turn on the Echo Spot’s camera and see what’s going on inside your bedroom. Hackers have already found a way to make the regular Echo device into a live microphone. If you willingly bring this device into your home, you have to understand that this could very well happen to you and accept the consequences.

People are being conditioned to give up privacy

Despite how outrageous all of this sounds, the product could do well for Amazon. Many people are becoming frighteningly accepting of the presence of so much monitoring in their lives, slowly but steadily giving up every remaining bit of privacy they have. It’s a price that some people will be willing to pay for the convenience the device offers. With features like video calling, displaying song lyrics, showing news clips, keeping you informed about the weather, and waking you up in the morning, some people won’t think twice about what they have to give up. For the rest of us, however, there remain plenty of ways to find out the temperature and get up in time for work without giving Amazon such an intimate view of our lives.

See PrivacyWatch.news for more coverage of privacy vs. technology.


Published @ Natural News


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John Vibes | Free Thought Project | Jan. 20, 2017

Tech giants Facebook, Google and Twitter testified to Congress this week about extremist content appearing on their platforms. In an odd admission, the companies promised to suppress extremist ideologies online by distributing their own counter propaganda, choosing to call it “counterspeech.”

Monika Bickert, Facebook’s head of global policy management told Congress on Wednesday that the site plans to take matters into their own hands.

“We believe that a key part of combating extremism is preventing recruitment by disrupting the underlying ideologies that drive people to commit acts of violence. That’s why we support a variety of counterspeech efforts,” Bickert said.

Meanwhile, representatives from Google admitted during the testimony that they use an algorithm to send anti-terror messages to people who they suspect of viewing seditious material. The use of this algorithm is known as the “Redirect Method,” and was developed by a team at Google called the Jigsaw research group.

Juniper Downs, YouTube’s head of public policy, also said that the company has plans to implement censorship on videos that they deem to be extremist.

“Our advances in machine learning let us now take down nearly 70% of violent extremism content within 8 hours of upload and nearly half of it in 2 hours,” Downs bragged during the testimony.

Meanwhile, Twitter has set up over 100 “training events” all over the world including at elite locations like the White House or United Nations.

Twitter’s Carlos Monje Jr., director of public policy and philanthropy in the U.S. and Canada, said the company has participated in more than 100 training events since 2015 on countering extremist content.

While countering terrorism is certainly a noble cause, as TFTP has reported at length, these tactics are also used to snub out peaceful views that simply challenge the status quo.

In recent months, social media organizations have come under fire for the negative impact that they have had on human interactions and society at large. These groups have taken the blame for the recent divisions that have been tearing friends and family apart along political lines, and that blame is well placed for the most part.

Much of this problem has been created by the algorithms that curate and select the content that we see online, not the platforms themselves. These problems did not exist when social media had free-flowing timelines that were unrestricted and in chronological order. Unfortunately, these companies do not want to give up the control they have on the content that you consume, so they are doubling down on their algorithms and will undoubtedly make the problems that they seek to solve much worse.

As we also reported this week, YouTube alienated a large portion of its audience this week by demonetizing all of their smaller content creators. In an email sent out to millions of independent artists, musicians, and journalists, YouTube informed them that they were no longer eligible for advertising revenue on the site because their channels were simply not big enough. The site now requires a minimum of 1000 subscribers and 4000 hours of viewed content, automatically disqualifying a large chunk of their creators from monetization.

These companies have become so far removed from their customers that they are no longer concerned with delivering a product that people actually want, which is the inevitable outcome of monopolies.

These organizations may have a stranglehold on the social media market for now, but it is only a matter of time before more free platforms are widely adopted. For example, a blockchain social media website called Steemit has been growing in popularity by the day. On that site, users get paid in cryptocurrency for posting, commenting and even “liking” other posts. You can find The Free Thought Project on Steemit @tftproject.


John Vibes is an author and researcher who organizes a number of large events including the Free Your Mind Conference. He also has a publishing company where he offers a censorship free platform for both fiction and non-fiction writers. You can contact him and stay connected to his work at his Facebook page. John is currently battling cancer , and will be working to help others through his experience, if you wish to contribute to his treatments consider subscribing to his podcast to support .


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Jake Anderson | AntiMedia | Nov. 27, 2017

It’s been a controversial month for the FDA. They drew the ire of kratom community by seeking to ban imports of the popular, safe pain reliever. During that same week, the agency approved the use of pills with sensors for the first time. The drugs, dubbed “smart pills,” are the first medication to be approved with a “digital ingestion tracking system.” While the ostensible purpose of “smart pills” is improved compliance and enhanced medical data, some critics are viewing the move as an Orwellian overture.

The “digital ingestion tracking system” will first be integrated into the atypical antipsychotic drug Abilify MyCite; it will record whether the drug was actually ingested.

In a press release, the FDA announced:

“The product is approved for the treatment of schizophrenia, acute treatment of manic and mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder and for use as an add-on treatment for depression in adults.”

The pill’s internal sensor contains copper, magnesium, and silicon. Upon exposure to stomach acid, it generates an electrical signal that is transmitted to a “wearable patch.” The information is forwarded from the patch to a smartphone app or physicians and caregivers associated with the patient.

In another press release, Mitchell Mathis, M.D., director of the Division of Psychiatry Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said that “[b]eing able to track ingestion of medications prescribed for mental illness may be useful for some patients.”

Others are not so optimistic. “There’s an irony in it being given to people with mental disorders than can include delusions. It’s like a biomedical Big Brother,”  said Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman, chairman of psychiatry at Columbia University and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

In a statement to the Anti-Media, Jamie Williams, Press Director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), raised concerns over privacy and patient understanding:

“There’s certainly privacy issues with these devices, just like with any devices that collect and transmit data about us, especially when the data is highly sensitive medical information. Information about exactly when you took exactly how much of a drug is not information thatcurrently exists right now. Its highly invasive and personal information about what is happening inside your body, which is what I think is drawing the ‘bio-medical Big Brother’ analogy. Instead of being able to read what’s going on inside your brain/thoughts, it can read what’s going on inside your stomach.

“Anyone who volunteers to swallow one of these pills needs to understand what that means, in terms of what data is collected, how it’s being used, and where it’s being stored? Are there situations in which law enforcement may want to access data about how much of a drug you had in your system at any given time, and what are the restrictions on their access?”

Some have noted the benefits of reining in medical costs, as experts say the healthcare industry spends $100 billion a year on ‘nonadherence or noncompliance.’

“This data is supposedly being collected to help patients and save the system money, but what are the limitations on making sure it’s not used to surveil everything they are putting into their stomach?” Williams asks. “The potential for surveillance and data mining will all depend on the limitations on collection, use, and storage of this data. New technologies are usually misused and abused first against the most powerless groups.”

We likely haven’t heard the end of the issue, and this is probably just the opening salvo of a “smart drugs” debate that could rage on for decades. As anxiety about government and corporate surveillance grows, will a line be drawn or will the public continue to acquiesce to invasive technology?


Originally Published @ Anti-Media


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