By Michael Snyder | End of the American Dream | Feb. 6, 2019

Scientists tell us that someday the “Big One” will strike California and large portions of the coastline will plunge into the ocean “almost instantly”. Could it be possible that we are a lot closer to that day than many had anticipated? Over the past several days, there has been a lot of shaking along the North American portion of the Ring of Fire. In particular, during a 24 hour period over the weekend one area of the California coastline was hit by 10 earthquakes of at least magnitude 3.0, and this created such a stir that it made the front page of the Drudge Report. The following comes from a local California newspaper

Ten earthquakes of preliminary magnitudes between 3.0 and 4.5 struck off the coast of Northern California between Saturday and Sunday, the United States Geological Survey reports.

Hopefully all of this shaking will turn out to be nothing, but many are concerned that they could potentially be “foreshocks” of a larger event.

Once the first quake hit early on Saturday, they just kept happening one after another

The first earthquake struck early Saturday morning at a magnitude of 4.3, while a second earthquake, of 3.2 magnitude, rumbled about 30 minutes later. Three additional earthquakes hit between 4:30 p.m. and 5:38 p.m. Saturday in the same area, registering magnitudes between 2.9 and 3.6, USGS reported. A 3.0-magnitude earthquake struck that night, at 11:37 p.m.

The geological activity continued into Sunday. USGS reported four earthquakes near Petrolia between 2:18 p.m. and 4:05 p.m. The earthquakes ranged in magnitude from 3.4 to 4.5.

Further south along the Ring of Fire, Mexico was hit by an even larger earthquake on Friday

A strong earthquake jolted southern Mexico on Friday, rattling nerves and swaying tall buildings hundreds of miles away in the capital, but there were no reports of serious damage, injuries or deaths.

The U.S. Geological Survey reported that the quake had a magnitude of 6.6. It was centered about 10 miles from the city of Tapachula in Chiapas state and struck at a depth of 40 miles.

If you follow my work on a regular basis, then you already know that I have been regularly documenting the dramatic rise in global seismic activity.

The crust of our planet is cracked, and we are just floating on the pieces. Now those pieces appear to be getting increasingly unstable, and that could mean big trouble for all of us.

I know that the weather is nice and that there are lots of good paying jobs out there, but at this point I don’t know why anyone would still want to live along the California coast. In a previous article, I shared a quote from a news story about a scientific study that had come to the conclusion that a massive earthquake “could plunge large parts of California into the sea almost instantly”…

The Big One may be overdue to hit California, but scientists near LA have found a new risk for the area during a major earthquake.

They claim that if a major tremor hits the area, it could plunge large parts of California into the sea almost instantly.

The discovery was made after studying the Newport-Inglewood fault, which has long been believed to be one of Southern California’s danger zones.

And there probably will be little to no warning when that occurs.

One day it will seem like everything is just fine, and then disaster will strike.

According to Cal State Fullerton professor Matt Kirby, it is something “that would happen relatively instantaneously”

Cal State Fullerton professor Matt Kirby, who worked with the Leeper on the study, said the sinking would occur quickly and likely result in part of California being covered by the sea.

“It’s something that would happen relatively instantaneously,” Prof Kirby said. “Probably today if it happened, you would see seawater rushing in.”

In other words, by the time you have figured out what is happening it will be too late.

Meanwhile, scientists are alarmed by the drama that continues to unfold at Mount St. Helens.

Most Americans think that it no longer poses an imminent threat, but the truth is that the area around the volcano has been very active in recent years

Since 1980, the area around the volcano has experienced tens of thousands of small earthquakes and numerous minor eruptions.

Most notably, as of 2004, the volcano has been continuously erupting lava, which has created a large dome that is still growing.

Scientists tell us that the dome is “now taller than the Empire State building” and that it continues to grow about five meters a day

He added: “What is really phenomenal is how much rock is still coming out of the ground.

“It’s now taller than the Empire State building.

“It’s coming up at five metres a day, more than 200 metres wide and it’s right here in our back yard.”

It is just a matter of time before we see another eruption like the one that we witnessed back in 1980.

We live at a time when global seismic activity is going to continue to increase, and North America is going to get hit particularly hard because the entire west coast sits directly along the Ring of Fire.

And if you have been a regular reader of my work for a long time, than you already know that I am even more concerned about Mount Rainier than I am about Mount St. Helens. But that is a topic for another article.

I know that there are a lot of people out there that plan to leave the west coast once things start getting really crazy, but when it comes to major seismic events, you might not get any warning.

Hopefully there will not be a major seismic event in the U.S. in the very near future, but without a doubt global seismic activity is on the rise, and all of this shaking on the west coast has a lot of people very, very nervous right now.


Contributed by Michael Snyder of EndOfTheAmericanDream.com

Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.


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By Mac Slavo | SHTFplan | January 14, 2019

Just when you think California cannot possibly come up with more things to tax, the new governor, Gavin Newsom, decides to tax drinking water. In Newsom’s first budget proposal on Friday, the communist included a tax on drinking water.

The new budget, titled “California for All,” declares drinking water a “fundamental right,” yet proposes to tax that “right.” “The Budget includes short-term measures to bring immediate relief to communities without safe drinking water and also proposes an ongoing sustainable funding source to address this problem into the future.”

The San Francisco Chronicle reported that the details of the proposed tax are unknown, however, a similar proposal was abandoned by then-Governor Jerry Brown last year after failing to garner enough support in the legislature. According to Breitbart, critics have already slammed the plan. Former Republican gubernatorial candidate Travis Allen is urging fellow Republicans to “take back” the state on social media, and the Howard Jarvis Taxpayer Association and the Association of California Water Agencies are saying that the state should tap into its budget surplus to pay for the needed clear water supplies.

Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund—Establish a new special fund, with a dedicated funding source from new water, fertilizer, and dairy fees, to enable the State Water Resources Control Board to assist communities, particularly disadvantaged communities, in paying for the short-term and long-term costs of obtaining access to safe and affordable drinking water. This proposal is consistent with the policy framework of SB 623, introduced in the 2017-18 legislative session. The Budget also includes $4.9 million General Fund on a one-time basis for the State Water Resources Control Board and the Department of Food and Agriculture to take initial steps toward implementation of this new Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Program, including (1) implementation of fee collection systems, (2) adoption of an annual implementation plan, and (3) development of a map of high-risk aquifers used as drinking water sources.




Newsom is using the typical democrat line of “helping the poor” clean up their water as an excuse to tax what he calls a “right.” And according to the Sacramento Bee, not everyone thinks taxing drinking water is a bad idea.  “We’re excited,” said Anja Raudabaugh, the CEO of Western United Dairymen. “We appreciate Governor Newsom’s commitment to providing long-term solutions to drinking water in our communities, and we’re looking forward to providing a solution that includes certainty for our dairy producers.”


Contributed by Mac Slavo of SHTFplan.com, where this article was originally published.


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By Carey Wedler | AntiMedia | August 16, 2018

A nuclear power plant in Southern California that was shut down in 2012 continues to leak radioactive material and poses a threat to nearby communities.

The aging San Onofre, located in San Clemente, CA, was shut down in 2012 amid a leak that occurred due to malpractice. According to a report released in 2016, the plant “operated the reactor outside the allowable limits for pressure and temperature, causing the radiation leak that shut down the facility for good,” the San Diego Tribune noted. The shutdown also launched extensive investigations that implicated both the power company and state regulators.

Though the plant is out of operation, it still stores 3.6 million pounds of lethal radioactive waste, and according to a worker who blew the whistle on the plant just last week, a near catastrophe just occurred. As local outlet the Dana Pointer reported, plant worker David Fritch explained what happened at a public meeting:

“On 3 August 2018, a 100-ton canister filled with highly radioactive nuclear waste was being ‘downloaded’ into a temporary transport carrier to be moved a few hundred yards from inside the plant to a storage silo buried near the world-famous San Onofre beach. As the thin-walled canister was being lowered into the transport cask, it snagged on a guide ledge four feet from the top. Crane operators were unaware that the canister had stopped descending and the rigging went completely slack, leaving the full weight of the heavy canister perched on that ledge by about a quarter-inch.

“Had the ledge not held for the hour or more it took workers to realize and address the error, the thin-walled canister of highly toxic nuclear waste would have fallen 18 feet to the ground below.”

Each canister reportedly has as much radiation as was released during the infamous Chernobyl nuclear disaster.

Fritch says the staff is too small — and also undertrained. According to an article published in the Los Angeles Times this week by Steve Chapple, an author, journalist, and fellow at the Samuel Lawrence Foundation:

“The idea is to bury the spent fuel on site, about 100 feet from the ocean and just a few feet above the water table. Edison has already begun transferring the waste from cooling pools into specially designed steel canisters. The containers are prone to corrosion and cracking, and cannot be monitored or repaired. Work crews even discovered a loose bolt inside one of the canisters earlier this year.”

As ocean levels keep rising, Chappelle says, seawater will come closer and closer to the cannisters. Further, “if hairline cracks or pinholes in the containers were to let in even a little bit of air, it could make the waste explosive.”

Further, San Onofre is located directly on an earthquake fault line in an area with a record of tsunamis.

San Juan Capistrano Councilwoman Pam Patterson told President Trump at a roundtable discussion in May that San Onofre is a “Fukushima waiting to happen.” She also expressed concern that the facility, which is a no-fly zone but secured mainly by armed guards, could be a target of a terror attack, noting that terrorists targeted nuclear power plants in addition to the World Trade Center and Pentagon.

Any time of disaster would have far-reaching effects. Shortly after the plant shut down, former prime minister of Japan, Naoto Kan testified in San Diego, noting that during the Fukushima meltdown, he was prepared to evacuate not just Tokyo, but regions as far as 160 miles from the plant. Downtown Los Angeles is only 62 miles away from San Onofre and 50 miles from San Diego. Worse, there are no state or federal evacuation plans in the event of a catastrophe.

Chappelle says that while solutions include moving the waste to a location 80 feet higher than the current plant, which is by the beach, or “maintain a cooling pool on site for emergency transfer efforts in the event of a cracked canister or terrorist attack,” these are all short-term solutions. As of last year, Edison was working on a plan to bury the nuclear waste, but Chapple believes the only way to truly resolve the problem is for Edison to develop storage technology that is not prone to severe leaks.

Though Edison has started that process, earlier this year San Onofre officials found a defect in the design created by Holtec, a contractor whose workers were responsible for the accident earlier this month.


Contributed by Carey Wedler of AntiMedia.com

Carey is the editor-in-chief of Anti-Media. Shortly after graduating from UCLA with a degree in History, she got her start making Youtube videos, which led her to Anti-Media. Besides editing, she also covers foreign policy, the war on drugs, and solution-oriented developments. Her work has been published in Newsweek, Ron Paul’s Liberty Report, and the Foundation for Economic Education. Contact Carey via email: carey.wedler@theantimedia.org. Support her on Patreon: patreon.com/CareyWedler


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