By Tyler Durden | Zero Hedge | Sept. 17, 2018

The Federal Emergency Management Agency  (FEMA), in coordination with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), will conduct a nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) on September 20th.

The emergency communications drill will begin at 2:18 p.m. EDT through 2:20 p.m. EDT. Every cell phone in the US will receive a text message from President Trump.

All US wireless firms and more than 100 mobile carriers are participating in the exercise that allows for presidential alerts, FEMA wrote in a Thursday press release.

“The EAS [Emergency Alert System] is a national public warning system that provides the president with the communications capability to address the nation during a national emergency,” FEMA said in a statement.

Cell phones will receive a text message that states “Presidential Alert” and “THIS IS A TEST of the National Wireless Emergency Alert System. No action is needed.”

Separate from the FEMA statement, a FEMA National Test Fact Sheet detailed how the EAS is used with radio and television broadcasters, cable systems, satellite radio and television providers, and wireline video providers. The upcoming FEMA EAS message will read:

“THIS IS A TEST of the National Emergency Alert System. This system was developed by broadcast and cable operators in voluntary cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Federal Communications Commission, and local authorities to keep you informed in the event of an emergency. If this had been an actual emergency, an official message would have followed the tone alert you heard at the start of this message. A similar Wireless Emergency Alert test message has been sent to all cell phones nationwide. Some cell phones will receive the message; others will not. No action is required.”

The WEA system is currently in use to warn the public about dangerous weather, missing children, and other vital information. The FEMA WEA message will read:

“THIS IS A TEST of the National Wireless Emergency Alert System. No action is needed.”

The goal of the test will evaluate the readiness to distribute an emergency message nationwide and determine whether improvements are needed, FEMA said in a statement. The upcoming alerts will be sent using FEMA’s Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS), which allows government officials to send emergency messages to multiple communications networks, including the EAS and WEA as part of the nation’s modern alert and warning infrastructure.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai explains how the Wireless Emergency Alert system works

Despite Trump’s obsession with Twitter as a direct means of communicating, experts told NBC News last week that President Trump will not abuse the “Presidential Alert” system.

“If you separate this from the politics and personality of any individual president then this is a great idea and an amazing use of technology to reach everybody if they’re in harms way,” said Karen North, director of the Annenberg Digital Social Media program at the University of Southern California.

UCLA communications professor Tim Groeling agreed, told NBC via email, “broadcast-based emergency alert systems … have remained professional and impartial over decades.”

How did Twitter respond to Trump’s new communication channels?

So when the tens of millions of Americans get the “Presidential Alert” on September 20, do not freak out — it is just President Trump debuting the new emergency communication systems that broadcast personalized emergency messages on a much larger plane than Twitter.

As for the many folks who have blocked him on social media, well, it is almost certain that there will be an uproar when liberals look at their phones and see a text message from Trump later this week.


Originally published by Tyler Durden at ZeroHedge.com


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By Michael Snyder | Economic Collapse | Sept. 14, 2018

Is something extremely unusual happening to our planet?  At this moment, Hurricane Florence is just one of seven named storms that are currently circling the globe.  That matches the all-time record, and it looks like that record will be broken very shortly as a couple more storms continue to develop.  Back in 2004, a Hollywood blockbuster entitled “The Day After Tomorrow” depicted a world in which weather patterns had gone mad.  One of the most impressive scenes showed nearly the entire planet covered by hurricane-type storms all at once.  Of course things are not nearly as bad as in that film, but during this hurricane season we have definitely seen a very unusual number of hurricanes and typhoons develop.  As our planet continues to change, could this become “the new normal”?

As I mentioned above there are currently seven named storms that are active, but an eighth is about to join them, and that would break the all-time record

The Hurricane season is causing devastation from the Pacific to the Atlantic as seven active storms are currently swirling across the globe – with high chances an eighth powerful storm will soon develop to break an all-time record.

And actually there is an additional storm that is also developing in the Pacific which could bring the grand total to nine.

Overall, there have been 9 named storms in the Atlantic and 15 names storms in the Pacific since the official start of the hurricane season.

That is not normal.

In fact, one veteran meteorologist has said that he has “NEVER seen so much activity in the tropics”…

Far from being the biggest threat facing the US coastline this hurricane season, Florence will be followed by several other storms that rapidly strengthening in the Atlantic. As one veteran meteorologist remarked, “in my 35 years forecasting the weather on TV, I have NEVER seen so much activity in the tropics all at the same time.”

Meanwhile, the biggest storm on the planet is actually in the Pacific Ocean.

Super Typhoon Mangku is a Category 5 hurricane, and it absolutely dwarfs Hurricane Florence

The devastating force of Hurricane Florence is nothing when compared to the category 5 hurricane sweeping over the Pacific Ocean, Super Typhoon Mangkhu.

With winds close to 180mph, the fierce hurricane is feared to land over a mountainous terrain in the northern Philippines on Friday night, before moving over the South China Sea and potentially impacting Hong Kong and Vietnam.

But let’s not minimize the seriousness of Hurricane Florence.  It is currently approximately the size of the state of Michigan, and even though it has been downgraded forecasters are still predicting that it will bring up to 40 inches of rain in some areas.

One meteorologist ran the numbers, and he determined that if the current forecasts are accurate the state of North Carolina could end up getting ten trillion gallons of rain

Weather.us meteorologist Ryan Maue crunched some numbers and tweeted that North Carolina’s 7-day rainfall forecast by the National Weather Service’s Weather Prediction Center would be like getting “a total of over 10 trillion gallons” of rain from Florence. The math was based on the projected state average of 10.1 inches of rainfall for that time span.

Yes, you read that correctly.

Ten trillion gallons of rain.

Needless to say, all of that water is going to cause an immense amount of damage.

Over in Virginia, a top official is warning that “there could be a number of dams that will fail”

In neighboring Virginia, officials with the state’s Department of Conservation and Recreation have identified some 100 dams they are concerned could be at risk, either because of “spotty inspection records” or because they are still being built.

“If we get 20 inches of rain in a relatively short period of time,” Russ Baxter, the department’s deputy director told the WSJ, “there could be a number of dams that will fail.”

As I write this article, some areas along the coast are already getting hammered.  Atlantic Beach has received more than 12 inches of rain, and other towns are already inundated with water.

It is going to be a long couple of days for those living along the Mid-Atlantic coast, and there were reports of panic among those making last-minute preparations

A rowdy crowd was shown in a Facebook video shared by an employee from the supermarket off Glenn School Road in Durham Tuesday pushing one another and shouting as they hurried around the store to gather their supplies.

Police officers were even spotted making their rounds around the Walmart to ensure the safety of shoppers.

One officer is seen restraining a young boy as another shopper drops several bottles of water.




This is yet another example that shows that you never wait until the last minute to get what you need.

In the end, the damage to property will be in the tens of billions of dollars, but only a handful of people will probably lose their lives.

Now that the storm has been downgraded, some are even booking rooms along the coast so that they can say that they rode the storm out.

For instance, 53-year-old Barry Freed says that he is sticking around so that he can cross this off his “bucket list”

For Barry Freed, 53, riding out a hurricane was a chance to cross something off his “bucket list.”

Armed with a few sodas, some M&Ms, Doritos and a copy of Moby Dick, the Greensboro resident booked an AirBnB at a condo here.

As skies darkened Thursday and winds whipped up at Waterway Lodge, just off the marina near Wrightsville Beach, Freed admitted he wasn’t really prepared.

“I kind of thought of this impulsively,” he said. “It’s kind of a stupid idea.”

Yes, it probably is a stupid idea, but I admire his courage.

This storm will come and go, and the recovery will take an extended period of time.

But the much bigger story is what is happening to our planet on a larger scale.  These storms are increasing in number and intensity, and that should definitely alarm all of us.


Contributed by Michael Snyder of The Economic Collapse blog.

Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.


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By Anti-Media Team | AntiMedia | Sept. 14, 2018

FEMA isn’t exactly known for its competence or efficiency, but as Hurricane Florence looms over the Carolinas and southern Virginia, an unlikely ally is providing support and guidance.

The popular restaurant chain Waffle House has a reputation for staying open all hours of the day, every day, even during hurricanes. In fact, a common reference point for how bad a hurricane has gotten comes in the form of whether the Waffle Houses in the area are open. “When Waffle House surrenders to a hurricane, you know it’s bad,” read one Miami Herald headline in 2016.

If you get there and the Waffle House is closed? That’s really bad. That’s where you go to work,” a FEMA employee told the outlet.

Even in harsh hurricane conditions, Waffle House will offer a limited menu with items that don’t require power, water, and gas to prepare. The restaurant usually won’t shut down unless it’s physically destroyed.




This tenacity led FEMA to create an index to gauge the severity of hurricanes and their damages using Waffle House as a barometer. In 2004, amid Hurricane Charley, then-FEMA administrator W. Craig Fugate, Florida state meteorologist Ben Nelson, and member of the National Guard were assessing the damage and attempting to find a place to eat.

As FiveThirtyEight detailed in 2016:

“‘They went to a Waffle House and noticed they had a limited menu, with nonperishable items,’ Alexa Lopez, FEMA’s press secretary, told me. ‘The next day, they were driving around and they went to a different Waffle House, and the same thing happened, a limited menu.’“So, she said, the group was inspired first to rank Waffle Houses in the same way: green for fully operational, yellow for a limited menu and red for closed. ‘Which is pretty bad, because Waffle House is always open,’ Lopez added. And, second, to use those observations as a proxy for how much a disaster disrupts a community.”

The so-called Waffle House Index also serves as an “indicator of how complex and long supply chains are — for food, for fuel, for power — and of what it takes to plan around infrastructure that can be fragile in unexpected ways.”

Though it’s not an official index, Waffle House does inform FEMA of its closures and shares wind speeds, power outages, and other measures.

Waffle House also has a “Storm Center,” where they monitor the development and impact of hurricanes.

They are currently monitoring Hurricane Florence, which has already prompted evacuation advisories for over a million residents and caused thousands of power outages, Though the storm was previously designated a Category 4, it is currently classified as a Category 2.

(editor’s note: storm conditions have changed since this article was originally published on Anti-Media.)


Originally published by Anti-Media.com


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