By Kurt Nimmo | Another Day In The Empire | Jan. 11, 2019

If Donald Trump wants a wall on the border, maybe he can ask Sheldon Adelson to chip in to pay for it. Adelson knows all about walls. His people in Israel built one to keep the Palestinians in their ghettos.

If the corporate news can be believed, Trump will take relief money earmarked for Puerto Rico and Texas to build his wall.

It’s all ego at this point. Trump has been humiliated by his inability to get a wall. It’s personal for him. Trump’s not concerned about a few billion dollars spent on a bad idea that will do little to stop illegal immigration.

Walls don’t stop people. Ask the families of East Germans shot dead trying to scale the Berlin Wall.




If the US didn’t muck around in Central and South America, supporting tyrants and training deaths squads to make investment safe for international banks and transnational corporations, there wouldn’t be mass migration of refugees fleeing US foreign policy.

If the state hadn’t declared a war on drugs—these guys love wars of all stripe—there wouldn’t be murderous cartels, first in Colombia, and now in Mexico. Drug money floats economies, including ours. Wakovia and other banks have made a fortune laundering drug money. Obama supported the Sinaloa cartel and played it off against its rivals, going so far as sending arms to narco terrorists.

Trump’s mulling of a “national emergency” (the pretext set with 9/11) isn’t included in the Constitution. It is an outrageous expansion of the imperial presidency.

There isn’t a crisis on the border—the murder rate here is much lower than say in Chicago or Baltimore—a fact I am able to confirm. I live forty miles from Mexico.

The argument for a wall is quite frankly bullshit. It was a selling point during the presidential campaign. It is now a battle to save face and elevate Trump’s personality. There are several more pressing issues—namely: illegal wars, a bankster manipulated monetary system, and a national debt that will flatten the country… and sooner before later.

Let’s see if Trump declares a national emergency—despite there not being an actual crisis or emergency—and let’s see what else he does with this awesome and illegal authority.

I fear a bit of Caliguia in Donald Trump.


Originally published by Kurt Nimmo at Another Day In The Empire.

Kurt Nimmo has blogged on political issues since 2002. In 2008, he worked as lead editor and writer at Infowars, and is currently a content producer for Newsbud.


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By Mac Slavo | SHTFplan | January 10, 2019

The government shutdown is just providing more evidence that the government itself is unnecessary. Private companies in the Yellowstone area are voluntarily paying to keep the park clean without federal funding.

According to Reason, nearly three weeks into the government shutdown, some of America’s national parks are starting to get a bit rank. Access to the parks (which are supposedly “owned” by the people who think they are the government) is free since there are no employees to collect the typical $35-per-vehicle entrance fee. But that comes with the trade-off of there being no employees to empty trash bins or clean toilets either.

Meanwhile, without being forced by the government, private companies are voluntarily paying to keep Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming clean. National Public Radio reports, local businesses are chipping in to make sure the bathrooms get cleaned, the roads get plowed, and the tourists keep coming. Even in the middle of winter, the park gets an estimated 20,000 visitors per month—and those hardy folks want to rent snowmobiles, hire tour guides, and take sightseeing trips. The private-sector businesses that thrive on those tourist dollars have a pretty strong incentive to make sure Yellowstone remains accessible – much more incentive than the government has.




This is what voluntary interaction looks like.  Not one single person is forcing these companies to pay for snow plowing, however, because it is in their best interests, they have decided to foot the bill. Xanterra Parks and Resorts, which runs the only hotels inside Yellowstone that remain open during the winter, is leading the effort to cover the $7,500 daily tab for keeping the roads plowed and the snowmobile trails groomed during the shutdown, NPR further reports. Thirteen other private businesses that offer tours of the park are also chipping in $300 a day to help cover that expense.

There’s also probably a useful lesson here about what the privatization of national parks would look like. Rather than the corporatized dystopia of environmentalist nightmares, removing the government from the equation would allow businesses that have a vested interest in maintaining and protecting America’s natural splendor to do exactly that—and would prevent the parks from being caught up in the unrelated drama of whatever nonsense is happening in Washington, D.C. –Reason

In all, it seems like a pretty straightforward lesson about how private businesses will respond to changing market conditions and incentives. Keeping the park accessible means those businesses can continue to profit off tourists, government shutdown or not.  The market has responded and as government becomes more obsolete and people begin to realize they can live their lives without a master dictating their every move and stealing their money, there will be more and more stories such as this that come to light.


Contributed by Mac Slavo of SHTFplan.com, where this article was originally published.


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* America Uncensored | January 9, 2019 *

President Donald Trump just told House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to take a hike and close the door on her way out.

While meeting with the president on Wednesday, democrats said they had no intention of changing their stance on funding the wall. Trump responded by showing them the door.




According to both the President and Vice President Pence, Trump asked Pelosi if he was to reopen the government now if she would fund the wall within 30 days? When she responded with “no”, Trump kicked her out.

The president then took to twitter, writing:

Just left a meeting with Chuck and Nancy, a total waste of time.

I asked what is going to happen in 30 days if I quickly open things up, are you going to approve Border Security which includes a Wall or Steel Barrier?

Nancy said, NO. I said bye-bye, nothing else works!

Trump chose to stand his ground for the security of the nation.

The presidents tweets prompted some to remember that Mexico was supposed to pay for the wall.

And others showing support.

Vice president Mike Pence confirmed the incident to reporters, saying:

“We just ended a very short meeting, We heard once again that Democratic Leaders are unwilling to negotiate,”

While many Americans would cheer the president’s decision to kick Nancy out of the White House, it would seem more fitting to kick her out of the country to see the wall from the other side.

Looking past all the talking heads, the government shutdown fiasco leaves just one question in the minds of hard working Americans. Why are taxes still being taken out of my check?!


Contributed by L. Steele of AmericaUncensored.net


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L. Steele | America Uncensored | October 25, 2018

Hundreds of U.S. troops are said to be making their way to America’s southern border to assist the National Guard and DHS aiming to stop a migrant caravan making its way from Honduras. According to a U.S. official, 800 soldiers are being sent to offer “logistical support”.

In response to president Trump’s threat to send the military to the border, Defense Secretary James Mattis could order the deployment as soon as today, Fox News reports.

The official said roughly 800 soldiers will be sent to the area to offer “logistical support,” including providing tents and vehicles.

It’s not immediately clear which units are being tasked with the mission as details are still being finalized.

Defense Secretary James Mattis could sign the deployment orders as soon as today.

Thursday morning, president Donald Trump took to twitter calling the caravan a “National Emergency” requiring military support to stop it.

The National Guard, assisting Homeland Security, currently has 2,100 troops on the southern border.

The caravan of around 7,000 migrants is still 1,000 or more miles away from the closest entry point into the United States. Many are suffering exhaustion and other health issues.

The actual number of migrants with the caravan is not known as some are turning back to their homelands while others are joining along the way. Sickness, fear and harassment are whittling down the caravan, CNBC reports.




Little by little, sickness, fear and police harassment are whittling down the migrant caravan making its way to the U.S. border, with many of the 4,000 to 5,000 migrants camped overnight under plastic sheeting in a town in southern Mexico complaining of exhaustion.

The group, many with children and even pushing toddlers in strollers, planned to depart Mapastepec at dawn Thursday with more than 1,000 miles still to go before they reach the U.S. border.

But in recent days a few hundred have accepted government offers to bus them back to their home countries.

President Trump continues to call for a border wall to help combat invasions such as the caravan heading this way. However, it seams to have less appeal now that republicans are trying to fund it through taxpayers instead of making Mexico pay for it as promised.

Though mainstream media outlets such as CNBC paints a picture of hundreds of migrants suffering trying to make their way to America for a better life, there is much more at stake. The safety of this nation. As Sara Carter points out, there are people joining up with the caravan from several terrorist countries including members of the MS 13 gang.

It’s hard to find fault with Trump’s decision to put our military on the border, it is after all where they belong. Our troops are spread out throughout the world fighting battles for rich globalist which have nothing to do with out freedom. The border is where they belong, protecting us from real threats.


Contributed by L.Steele of AmericaUncensored.net, where this article was originally published.


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